How do you explain anaphylaxis to a child?

How do you explain anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis (an-a-fi-LAK-sis) is a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction. The most common anaphylactic reactions are to foods, insect stings, medications and latex. If you are allergic to a substance, your immune system overreacts to this allergen by releasing chemicals that cause allergy symptoms.

How a child might describe an allergic reaction?

A child might use words like these to describe a reaction:

“This food is too spicy.” “My tongue [or mouth] is hot [or burning, tingling, itching].” “It feels like something’s poking my tongue.” “It [my tongue] feels like there is hair on it.”

What action should be taken if a child shows symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction?

Anaphylactic reaction

Have your child lie down, but if breathing is difficult allow them to sit. Inject your child with the autoinjector, and call an ambulance immediately. A second autoinjector is sometimes needed while waiting for an ambulance.

What happens when a child goes into anaphylactic shock?

Common signs of anaphylaxis in babies include vomiting, diarrhea, crankiness, fast heartbeat, hives and swelling of the lips, eyes or other parts of the body. Other signs include shortness of breath, trouble breathing, wheezing (whistling sound while breathing) and dizziness.

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What are the 5 most common triggers for anaphylaxis?

Common anaphylaxis triggers include:

  • foods – including nuts, milk, fish, shellfish, eggs and some fruits.
  • medicines – including some antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin.
  • insect stings – particularly wasp and bee stings.
  • general anaesthetic.

Can you survive anaphylaxis without treatment?

Anaphylaxis happens fast and produces serious symptoms throughout the entire body. Without treatment, symptoms can cause serious health consequences and even death.

What are two signs of anaphylaxis?

Symptoms

  • Skin reactions, including hives and itching and flushed or pale skin.
  • Low blood pressure (hypotension)
  • Constriction of your airways and a swollen tongue or throat, which can cause wheezing and trouble breathing.
  • A weak and rapid pulse.
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Dizziness or fainting.

14.09.2019

What are the 4 types of allergic reactions?

Allergists recognize four types of allergic reactions: Type I or anaphylactic reactions, type II or cytotoxic reactions, type III or immunocomplex reactions and type IV or cell-mediated reactions.

How do you calm an allergic reaction?

To help reduce itching and soothe inflamed skin, try these self-care approaches:

  1. Avoid the irritant or allergen. …
  2. Apply an anti-itch cream or lotion to the affected area. …
  3. Take an oral anti-itch drug. …
  4. Apply cool, wet compresses. …
  5. Avoid scratching. …
  6. Soak in a comfortably cool bath. …
  7. Protect your hands.

19.06.2020

How quickly does anaphylaxis occur?

Anaphylaxis can occur within minutes. It mostly occurs within 20 minutes to 2 hours after exposure to the allergen. Signs and symptoms may be mild at first, but can rapidly worsen.

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What is the difference between an allergic reaction and anaphylaxis?

The difference between an allergic reaction and anaphylaxis is the latter involves the respiratory and/or cardiovascular system. “People who have an allergic reaction often have skin symptoms, so they might have a rash, they might have some swelling of the face, the lips or the eyes,” Ms Said said.

How can you tell the difference between an allergic reaction and anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis Definition

A major difference between anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions is that anaphylaxis typically involves more than one system of the body. Symptoms usually start within 5 to 30 minutes of coming into contact with an allergen to which an individual is allergic.

What is the first aid for anaphylaxis?

Emergency first aid for severe allergic reactions

Emergency responses for severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) are: lay the person flat – do not allow them to stand or walk. administer adrenaline with an autoinjector (such as an EpiPen®) always dial triple zero (000) to call an ambulance in a medical emergency.

Is Baby anaphylaxis common?

Research shows a rising number of children being treated in emergency departments for anaphylaxis in recent years. Allergic reactions are unpredictable in terms of when they occur, what types of symptoms develop, and the severity of those symptoms; they can happen to children at any age, including infants.

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